Endo Warrior

Now, I’m bravely to say it loud as I am a warrior

“I’m selfish, impatient, and a little insecure. I make mistakes, I am out of control and at times hard to handle. But if you can’t handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don’t deserve me at my best.”Marilyn Monroe

Life change, when I have got diagnosed that I have endometriosis, I just think that my life just ends shortly. I cried a lot and it hurt me so much. I just don’t believe it happened to me

Let’s get closer with this one.

Endometriosis is relatively common, affecting about 1 in 10 women worldwide — but that doesn’t mean it’s easy to pinpoint. While reasons for the delay may vary widely from person to person, here’s a deeper look into what may slow the path to a diagnosis of endometriosis

What is endometriosis?

Endometriosis is a disorder in which tissue similar to the tissue that forms the lining of your uterus grows outside of your uterine cavity. The lining of your uterus is called the endometrium. Endometriosis occurs when endometrial tissue grows on your ovaries, bowel, and tissues lining your pelvis. It’s unusual for endometrial tissue to spread beyond your pelvic region, but it’s not impossible. Endometrial tissue growing outside of your uterus is known as an endometrial implant.

The hormonal changes of your menstrual cycle affect the misplaced endometrial tissue, causing the area to become inflamed and painful. This means the tissue will grow, thicken, and break down. Over time, the tissue that has broken down has nowhere to go and becomes trapped in your pelvis.

This tissue trapped in your pelvis can cause:

  • irritation
  • scar formation
  • adhesions, in which tissue binds your pelvic organs together
  • severe pain during your periods
  • fertility problems

What causes endometriosis?

During a regular menstrual cycle, your body sheds the lining of your uterus. This allows menstrual blood to flow from your uterus through the small opening in the cervix and out through your vagina.

The exact cause of endometriosis isn’t known, and there are several theories regarding the cause, although no one theory has been scientifically proven.

One of the oldest theories is that endometriosis occurs due to a process called retrograde menstruation. This happens when menstrual blood flows back through your fallopian tubes into your pelvic cavity instead of leaving your body through the vagina.

Another theory is that hormones transform the cells outside the uterus into cells similar to those lining the inside of the uterus, known as endometrial cells.

Others believe the condition may occur if small areas of your abdomen convert into endometrial tissue. This may happen because cells in your abdomen grow from embryonic cells, which can change shape and act like endometrial cells. It’s not known why this occurs.

These displaced endometrial cells may be on your pelvic walls and the surfaces of your pelvic organs, such as your bladder, ovaries, and rectum. They continue to grow, thicken, and bleed over the course of your menstrual cycle in response to the hormones of your cycle.

It’s also possible for the menstrual blood to leak into the pelvic cavity through a surgical scar, such as after a cesarean delivery (also commonly called a C-section).

Another theory is that the endometrial cells are transported out of the uterus through the lymphatic system. Still another theory purports it may be due to a faulty immune system that isn’t destroying errant endometrial cells.

Some believe endometriosis might start in the fetal period with misplaced cell tissue that begins to respond to the hormones of puberty. This is often called Mullerian theory. The development of endometriosis might also be linked to genetics or even environmental toxins.

Endometriosis can be a difficult condition to deal with, both physically and emotionally.

“It is not easy to talk about a condition once dismissed as ‘the career women’s disease’. But women will continue to suffer until we realise the cost of ignoring it”― Hilary Mantel

Referred from

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/endometriosis/

https://www.healthline.com/health/endometriosis

https://www.everydayhealth.com/hs/womens-health/endometriosis-diagnosis/

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